Latest Posts

How owning a practice is like being a renaissance (wo)man

renaissance-wo-manThe “Renaissance Men” were sublime combinations of artist, engineer, and scientist.  They were masters of each discipline, and are considered the most well-rounded talents to ever draw breath.  Truth be told, owning a practice is more like being a “Renaissance (Wo)Man” than you might think. In contrast to the masters, though, we receive highly specialized training in treating dental disease and very little about the “other stuff.” Every dental office is full of protocols and contraptions that are not covered in school. That is not a reason to exclude owning from the menu of options open to you after graduation! Here are five keys to unlocking the mysteries of the non-clinical aspects of private practice.

How to communicate with your patient: part I (video series)

patient communication videoAs dental students, our experiences involving patient communication are rather limited. While we have the ability to practice our craft on a manikin, we can never fully prepare ourselves for the different scenarios where we may need to manage a patient in order to provide quality care. This three-part video series focuses on how to navigate difficult communication situations, so that hopefully you would be prepared when faced with a similar situation!

Make a first impression on your patients

female doctorMany are quick to judge those they meet, including dentists, based solely on what they see. These initial opinions can be hard to change. Non-verbal aspects like hairstyle, clothing, posture and jewelry are often used when developing these early judgments. Some studies show that people trust appearance cues more than actual information about a person. As dentists, it is important to recognize that patients may draw conclusions about us based solely on that first interaction. What we wear to the office that day could help or hurt our patient-doctor relationships.

Has the Flint, Michigan, water crisis hit a nerve in the fluoride debate?

flint water crisisWhen the water source of a small community in Michigan was switched from Lake Huron to the Flint River due to financial issues, the devastating long term effects of this decision took the nation by storm. During the nearly two years that the city of Flint was using the toxic water source, its citizens cried out for help. But by the time the city reacted, the damage was irreversible in many ways. According to an article from NPR on April 20, 2016, a resident of Flint had her water tested for lead at 104,000 parts per billion in 2015. The Environmental Protection Agency’s limit for drinking water is 15,000 parts per billion.

Living with infective endocarditis

Living with IEWhen dentists hear the words infective endocarditis (IE), they often reflexively think of the same precaution: prophylactic antibiotics before dental treatment, 2g Amoxicillin or 500mg Clindamycin. IE is one of the few diseases our patients may develop following bacteremia from invasive dental procedures, but thankfully, its incidence is relatively rare. Some health conditions place patients at a higher risk for IE, such as an artificial heart valve, a cardiac transplant prone to developing valvulopathy or a congenital heart defect. Men over the age of 50 are also predisposed to developing IE. When we consider this fact, you might wonder: what are the chances that a 25 year old, healthy female could contract IE?

Typography in the dental office

typographyTimes New Roman. Helvetica. Comic Sans. Most of us are familiar with these fonts due to their prolific use in media we see daily. But, have you ever stopped to consider how font choice, size and style can impact your choices, especially in the context of a dental office?

Typography is defined as the style, arrangement or appearance of printed letters on a page. However, it encompasses more than just being able to change the color of letters or bolding important words. Read more about how typography applies to dentistry in today’s post!