ASDA Archives

Why redheads need more local anesthesia

redheadAs dental students we have done it hundreds of times already: local anesthesia. It’s may be the only procedure we have 100% confidence in completing. It’s like July 4th fireworks going off in dental brains because the patient’s “lip feels huge” and it is time to start the procedure. Yet, on a rare occasion, when we go through the normal routine with the appropriate dosage of anesthesia, they still have sensation. What gives?

Sports dentistry: From final impressions to the NBA Finals

Imagine yourself 10 years from now, running a successful dental practice in your hometown. After a long day of seeing patients, you run through a mental checklist of everything that needs to be done. Did all the lab work get sent out? Are charts up to date? Did the front desk call patients to remind them of their appointments?

What if you also had to figure out what time Kobe Bryant’s helicopter would land outside your office? Or navigate through 20 miles of infamous Southern California rush hour traffic to make it just in time for tipoff ? This is the world of Dr. Jeffrey Hoy, the team dentist for the NBA’s Los Angeles Lakers and NHL’s Los Angeles Kings.

How dental anxiety affects your patients

This article originally appeared as the lead news story in the May 2014 issue of ASDA News. To read more from ASDA’s print publication, Contour, click here.

A fearful patient can pose a considerable treatment challenge, especially for dental students who may unintentionally miss signals that their patient is uncomfortable.

Dr. Peter Milgrom, professor of oral health sciences at the University of Washington and founder and former director of its Dental Fears Research Clinic, believes that students lacking clinical experience “tend to completely focus on technical procedures” or “feel under pressure to perform at a certain rate” because of clinic time constrictions or limited rest breaks.

Dr. Lucy Hobbs Taylor paves way for women as first female dentist

This article originally appeared as a cover story in the March 2015 issue of ASDA News. At the time, Laura Albarracin was her chapter’s legislative liaison. To read more from ASDA’s print publication, Contour, click here.

Before the 1970s, dentistry was a male-dominated profession. Women were not admitted to dental school solely based on gender. However, this did not stop determined people from breaking stereotypes. That decade marked a time when the world was changing. Two catalytic moments were the women’s liberation and civil rights movements of the 1960s and early 1970s. This movement resulted in an increase in federal grants, which led way to an increase of female enrollments in professional health schools. According to an article written by Dr. Lynn D. Carlisle on Spiritofcaring.com, the women of the 1970s used this moment to forever change the landscape of the medical and dental fields.

Dentists with dual dream jobs

For many of us, dentistry is a dream job. And for some, it’s a profession that lets us chase our other dreams.

Dr. T. Bob Davis saw dentistry as a chance to keep up with a childhood passion. He started playing piano as a kid, and his first memory is of watching “Goodnight Irene” and trying to play songs from the movie on a piano. Dr. Davis took lessons throughout high school and began recording albums in dental school.

Is the media making dentists look bad?

newspapers-tabletThis article originally appeared in the Fall 2014 issue of Mouth. At the time, Stephanie Mazariegos, LECOM ’15, was the trustee from District 5. To read more from Mouth, click here.

For every headline that indicates dentists rank high among “most trusted professions,” there’s another condemning a dentist for fraud or patient mistreatment. As you enter a profession that relies on public trust, consider that the actions you take are a reflection on both you and the profession itself.

Is the media making dentists look bad?

Ethical terms such as nonmaleficence, autonomy and beneficence stand at the forefront of quality patient care…

Make a first impression on your patients

female doctorMany are quick to judge those they meet, including dentists, based solely on what they see. These initial opinions can be hard to change. Non-verbal aspects like hairstyle, clothing, posture and jewelry are often used when developing these early judgments. Some studies show that people trust appearance cues more than actual information about a person. As dentists, it is important to recognize that patients may draw conclusions about us based solely on that first interaction. What we wear to the office that day could help or hurt our patient-doctor relationships.