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Why dental students need life insurance. Now.

As a Great-West Financial Insurance Plan Specialist, one of my most important responsibilities is helping ADA student members understand the importance of life insurance.

I understand — when your future is so full of promise, it’s hard to think about the possibility of dying. Yet, as someone who has worked with dentists of all ages, I can tell you, bad things do happen, even to dental students. I know some of you have experienced this firsthand.

Why my office has a nursery

The following is brought to you as part of a series supported by Patterson Dental.

In elementary school, I started telling my mother I wanted to be a dentist when I grew up. I’m from a family of 5 active kids so I also dreamed of having kids and being an involved parent at their sporting events. Being the planner that I am, as I grew older, I couldn’t help but imagine the perfect career. I knew I wanted to have a dental practice of my own that would allow me to have my kids there and to set my own hours so I could be present in all their activities.

Why you should never be a “boss”

“Boss” originated in the early 19th century as a term used in place of calling someone “master.” As a noun, it is a person who exercises authority. When used as a verb it can mean, “authoritative and domineering.” Given these definitions, why would you ever want to use the term “boss” to describe your workplace title?

Made for millennials

As the population changes, businesses respond to the needs of their various markets. The insurance industry is no different. At Treloar & Heisel, we work with many large national companies that offer insurance products. Our job is to keep a pulse on the market, assess what’s available and evaluate best fit for our clients on a case-by-case basis. One of the companies that has recently made changes to its disability income product is MassMutual. What’s changed, and why should you care? Read on!

ASDA + Memorang DAT study material giveaway

Before he became Dr. Cohen, Yermie went from MIT where exams were open-book, to medical school at UCLA, where the number of scientific terms to learn was like a daily avalanche. Existing study aids were either outrageously expensive, or too simplistic for higher education. Instead of spending an arm and a leg on test prep, Yermie called upon his MIT network to build a tool that made memorizing easy. A year later, and a third of all medical students in the U.S. were using Memorang to conquer their exams.