Featured Posts

Paying the price for the DAT

When I made the decision to pursue dental school, I knew that I would not only have to take one of the most difficult exams of my life, but also pay for it as well. The challenge of taking the DAT did not deter me, but the significant cost in order to achieve the success I wanted almost did. Through my initial research, I learned that taking the DAT alone was $415! I would also need to purchase several DAT study materials to prepare me for the exam.

Four benefits of being bilingual

As part of such a diverse class of dental students, I find myself in awe of how many different languages we can collectively speak. The diversity in my class alone is reflective of the diversity that we have in the U.S. According to the US Census Bureau, about a quarter of Americans speak a language other than English at home. In 2010, Spanish was the widest-spoken language other than English. Other common languages include French, Chinese, Tagalog, Vietnamese, Korean and German. Clearly, in today’s globalized world, multilingualism is increasingly important. Here are some reasons speaking another language can benefit both you and the people around you…

The Advanced Dental Admissions Test, one year later

As the second year of the ADAT test cycle approaches, it becomes more and more apparent that the ADAT is here to stay. The ADA launched the Advanced Dental Admission Test (ADAT) in April of 2016 to test dental students, as well as practicing dentists, interested in postgraduate training. The purpose of the exam is to provide advanced dental education programs with a means to assess applicants’ potential for success. With the roll out of the ADAT and our first look at the participating programs, I was curious to see how the pilot year fared. Here are some takeaway points from the results…

Getting personal with your statement

Now that Dec. 1 and Phase I/II Match Days have passed, it’s time for the next round of prospective dental school and residency applicants to start thinking about that personal statement. Many of us remember struggling as predental students to convey our passion for dentistry – all without using the word ‘passion’ – in only 4,500 characters. Yet, whether you’re a predental student or a residency hopeful, writing that personal statement rarely comes easy. After all, the personal statement is often considered the most important part of your application. When thousands of equally qualified candidates are applying to the same program with a similar GPA, test scores and extracurriculars, how can you make yourself stand out among the rest?

Outdoor hobbies might just improve your dentistry

I love waking up to the smell of the crisp, mountain air. A gentle breeze rustles the trees. It’s a much-needed respite from the musty city air I’m used to. Most people can’t tell the difference until they have experienced it, but the contrast is unmistakable.

For me, backpacking is a great avenue to escape the stresses of dental school.