Management Monday

Contour extended: Which residency program is right for you?

The June/July issue of Contour is all about the road to residency. In this Management Monday post, Drs. Ivy Peltz and Eric Studley shed light on finding the right residency for you. Both Drs. Peltz and Studley are professors at NYU College of Dentistry. While Management Monday usually focuses on how to manage people or run a dental office, the first stop to building this type of experience is usually a residency. For more from these authors, check out their op-ed piece in June/July Contour.

At this time of year, we have become accustomed to answering two questions asked by third-year dental students. The first is: “Should I apply to residency programs?” The second is: “How do I know which residency program is right for me?”

Private practice is closer than you think

Finally, after years of hard work, good grades and months of submitting applications, you’ve been accepted into dental school. The pressure is off.

At that point in your life, if you were to have closed your eyes and gazed into your future what would you have seen?  What was your vision?  Did you see yourself in a traditional private practice where you were an extension of your patient family?  A situation similar your family dentist or mentor?  Did you envision the newest hi-tech gadgets in a stylish office in a medical/dental complex?

How to get your patients to just say “yes”

Your job during the course of your dental education is to learn what you need to become an excellent practitioner. Much of that knowledge needs to be applied in order for you to learn effectively. Although your school provides you with patients, some of them seem to slip through your hands (metaphorically speaking, of course). Patients are here one day, but gone the next. Some leave because they’re frightened. Some leave because they can’t afford the treatment. But some leave because they don’t want to do what you’re suggesting needs to be done. Since your success in dental school depends on your ability to get your patients to agree to the treatment you recommend, it’s important to understand how to achieve a higher rate of case acceptance.

Dentists with dual dream jobs

For many of us, dentistry is a dream job. And for some, it’s a profession that lets us chase our other dreams.

Dr. T. Bob Davis saw dentistry as a chance to keep up with a childhood passion. He started playing piano as a kid, and his first memory is of watching “Goodnight Irene” and trying to play songs from the movie on a piano. Dr. Davis took lessons throughout high school and began recording albums in dental school.

How to build a long-lasting relationship with faculty members

Idea and teamwork concept You know how every chef movie has an aspiring sous chef who admires the head chef, but the head chef either doesn’t have the desire or can’t seem to find time to mentor the sous chef? In this regard, the dental profession is no different from the food preparation profession.

Everyone talks about mentor relationships. Some people have them, but would like more. Some people would like to find just one. No matter how you slice it, if you’d like a mentor, you will probably have to do something to initiate the relationship. So how do you go about creating a mentor relationship with a faculty or senior colleague?

The perfect partnership

Daryn Lu found the perfect fit with his partner.Following dental school, we search high and low for the perfect fit. No matter the practice setting, chances are you’ll be working alongside another dentist. I’ve been blessed to work with an incredible mentor for the past 1.5 years.

From the moment I met him right before graduating dental school, he’s been there to support me clinically with complex cases, emotionally on the days when dentistry has kicked my butt and through leadership challenges when I’ve struggled with the team. We recently sat down for a meeting where he shared with me, “I’m happy where I am with dentistry. My greatest success will be when you succeed.”