Features

How I found happiness in dental school

We all want to feel accepted, included and a part of something bigger. For most of us, becoming a dentist was once just a dream. Now we have the opportunity to learn, grow and develop skills to achieve our dream. Dentistry is a social, collaborative and interactive profession that requires empathy, compassion and respect. We work hard so that, one day, we can take care of our patients. However, the environment of dental school can exacerbate existing insecurities. As a consequence, we sometimes forget how to take care of ourselves and our peers.

Contour extended: Which residency program is right for you?

The June/July issue of Contour is all about the road to residency. In this Management Monday post, Drs. Ivy Peltz and Eric Studley shed light on finding the right residency for you. Both Drs. Peltz and Studley are professors at NYU College of Dentistry. While Management Monday usually focuses on how to manage people or run a dental office, the first stop to building this type of experience is usually a residency. For more from these authors, check out their op-ed piece in June/July Contour.

At this time of year, we have become accustomed to answering two questions asked by third-year dental students. The first is: “Should I apply to residency programs?” The second is: “How do I know which residency program is right for me?”

Exercise your mind with meditation

Being a dentist seems glamorous, fun and exciting. There is always a new challenge around the corner with every patient. However, the process of becoming a dentist is not always glamorous and fun.   A significant number of hours are spent behind a laptop studying for exams and quizzes. What’s more, there are assignments, simlab requirements, patients to treat and board materials to study.  The rigors of dental school cavl cause you to sleep less and abandon socializing, ultimately increasing mental fatigue and stress.

I’m not a dentist, but I play one on TV

Dentists have long been demonized in Hollywood. With our wickedly sharp instruments and penchant for causing bleeding (perio probing is important, okay??), it’s not hard to understand why. We’re not always portrayed as malicious sadists, however. I still get a laugh from movie dentists who are hopelessly friendly and naïve. Below are some of the most famous (and most entertaining) TV and movie dentists currently shaping patient opinions.

Questions all new associates should ask

Many new dentists interview for associate positions.  One of our most often asked question from newly graduated dentists is: “What should I ask a prospective employer when I interview for an associate position?” The information you gather can have a major impact on your job satisfaction and your paycheck. Below is a list of the most relevant questions that you should ask when you start the interview process.

Private practice is closer than you think

Finally, after years of hard work, good grades and months of submitting applications, you’ve been accepted into dental school. The pressure is off.

At that point in your life, if you were to have closed your eyes and gazed into your future what would you have seen?  What was your vision?  Did you see yourself in a traditional private practice where you were an extension of your patient family?  A situation similar your family dentist or mentor?  Did you envision the newest hi-tech gadgets in a stylish office in a medical/dental complex?