Students

How to prepare to retake the DAT

Retaking the DAT can be a rollercoaster of emotions and stress when you’re not sure how to react or prepare after receiving an unexpected score. I remember the moment after my first attempt, crying in my car and not knowing what to do. I applied to dental schools earlier that summer, hoping my DAT score would be strong enough for consideration, but it didn’t make the cut. All my plans, hopes and dreams for the next year felt crushed in a single second, and I felt so much regret, grief and disappointment for some time.

Tailoring your DAT study schedule

Studying for the DAT may seem like a daunting task at first, but with a study plan tailored to your availability, goals, strengths and weaknesses, you can achieve your target score. A quick Google search will reveal several DAT study guides and could be a good tool to help you construct your own. These are our study plans, which show you that there are different ways to prepare for the exam. It’s important that you customize a schedule that works best for you.

A comprehensive list of DAT resources

Feeling overwhelmed by the thought of taking the DAT? Not sure where to begin studying? You might be wondering how on earth you are going to study for a five-hour exam that tests your knowledge on content you probably haven’t encountered in years (or at all, in the case of spatial knowledge). The Dental Admission Test (DAT) can appear daunting at first, but luckily, there are a variety study materials that are tailored to different learning styles and starting background knowledge to help you achieve your dream DAT score.

The dentist’s role in fighting the opioid epidemic

For the second year in a row, the U.S. life expectancy has declined, and the ongoing opioid epidemic is at least partly to blame, according to a report published in December 2017 by the National Center for Health Statistics. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, death rates tied to drug overdoses climbed 18 percent each year between 2014 and 2016. Over 63,000 people died of drug overdoses in 2016, with adults between 25–54 years old being the most likely victims.

Leadership after graduation

In April 2012, I emptied my class locker, turned in my required department signatures and stood in line with half a dozen classmates to terminate clinic privileges as a graduating dental student. Maybe I was expecting confetti or balloons. A parade for all of us seemed appropriate. But instead, there was just some paperwork to be completed and the return of my student ID and ASDA office key.

Lobby Day 2018: The issues you need to know

Next week, hundreds of dental students and dentists will be participating in my favorite day: lobby day. This year will be exciting, as we have two pieces of legislation that have passed the House with overwhelming support, and it’s also the  second year that ADA and ASDA have lobbied together on Capitol Hill. The beauty of this day is that regardless of race, gender, religion, sexual orientation or political persuasion, we unite as one “tooth party” to advocate for legislation that promotes oral health.

What dental students should know about risk management

Risk management is our best defense to ensure a healthy and prosperous dental practice. Ranging from malpractice claims to employee claims, becoming familiar with common lawsuits in dentistry is critical. It is also vital to practice risk management in your dental practice. Risk management is significant in combating and defending yourself against claims and lawsuits. Outlined are essential details to recognize when considering risk management in your dental practice.