Students

Five unexpected benefits of becoming a dental educator

Many dental professionals are drawn to a career in education. Some of the benefits are obvious: You get to give back to the profession by passing on your knowledge; you gain prestige from your participation in an academic program; and you can depend on a stable (though low!) income. In addition to those, there are other, more unexpected benefits that come with a career in dental education.

Lobby Day 2018: Making an impact on Capitol Hill

What more could you ask for? Hundreds of dental professionals on the Hill. Students engaging with experienced dentists and lobbyists. Cherry blossoms in bloom. This was the scene during the 2018 ADA Dentist and Student Lobby Day, held April 8–10, where more than 1,000 dentists and students gathered from across the country to advocate on behalf of our profession.

Practicing corporate social responsibility as a dentist

After 45 years in private practice, Dr. Daniel Braun can still say, “HealthLink is better than any place I’ve seen in private practice. Period. And it’s free. If you can beat that, you show me where.” Dr. Braun has volunteered at the HealthLink Dental Clinic in Southampton, Pennsylvania, ever since retiring in 2004. After 14 years with the clinic, the 1968 graduate from Baltimore College of Dental Surgery still ranks it supreme in care.

From bean to brew: Get to know your morning coffee

Coffee is a universal language, whether it’s a caramel macchiato with almond milk and whip or a tiny espresso shot more relatable to tar. There is care and precision that goes into transforming a humble plant into a delicious beverage. It may greet us every morning before anyone else, but do we really know anything about it? Let’s take a look at the behind-the-scenes world of our morning — and sometimes late-night — best friend.

Maximizing your position as an associate

For many of us, part of the decision to become a dentist was based on our desire to work independently without a “boss.” While that may be the goal, even those who intend to become business owners and independent practitioners may have to report to someone along the way. Most will start off working for someone else, whether as an associate in a dental corporation or in a private dental practice. While you may be the preferred provider for many patients in the practice, in order to truly succeed in these initial positions, you will need to figure out how to build a good relationship with your boss and get the most out of your time in that practice.

How to prepare to retake the DAT

Retaking the DAT can be a rollercoaster of emotions and stress when you’re not sure how to react or prepare after receiving an unexpected score. I remember the moment after my first attempt, crying in my car and not knowing what to do. I applied to dental schools earlier that summer, hoping my DAT score would be strong enough for consideration, but it didn’t make the cut. All my plans, hopes and dreams for the next year felt crushed in a single second, and I felt so much regret, grief and disappointment for some time.

Tailoring your DAT study schedule

Studying for the DAT may seem like a daunting task at first, but with a study plan tailored to your availability, goals, strengths and weaknesses, you can achieve your target score. A quick Google search will reveal several DAT study guides and could be a good tool to help you construct your own. These are our study plans, which show you that there are different ways to prepare for the exam. It’s important that you customize a schedule that works best for you.