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Questions all new associates should ask

Many new dentists interview for associate positions.  One of our most often asked question from newly graduated dentists is: “What should I ask a prospective employer when I interview for an associate position?” The information you gather can have a major impact on your job satisfaction and your paycheck. Below is a list of the most relevant questions that you should ask when you start the interview process.

Investigating the mouth-body connection

We all know the expression “the eyes are the window to the soul.” As oral health professionals, we view the mouth as the window to the entire body. Studies have shown that good oral health correlates to better overall health. Contrarily, poor oral health has been linked to a long list of systemic diseases. A 2011 article in Diabetologia found a prominent link between oral health and diabetes.

What to expect while expecting in dental school

May 14, 2016 is a day that I will never forget. My first year of dental school was behind me, and I was standing at the altar marrying my best friend. Since then, life has exceeded my expectations and filled me with wonderful memories. On September 25, 2016, my wife approached me with a worrisome look. I had seen her worried before, but this was different. I listened as she said three words that changed my life forever: “I am pregnant.”

As an expecting father and dental student, balancing life and school can be difficult. Although it is not as difficult as it would be if I were the one who’s pregnant. The hardest part for me is missing some of my wife’s appointments. While it is frustrating, it does not compare to the obstacles faced by pregnant students. To better understand the challenges of being pregnant, I interviewed two expecting student mothers from my dental school. Justina Boles (D1) is expecting her second child in September and Leigh Lloyd (D4) is expecting her first child in June.

A year in reflection

As I sit here, I can’t help but notice the decreased emails, the increased silence of my phone, and my shorter “to-do” list. Life post-presidency has not been as exciting as it once was, but it has given me some time to reflect on my experiences. What a year it has been. A year filled with accomplishments, expansions, victories, innovations and, above all, personal growth. I can never be thankful enough for those who put their faith in me as president to help continue to lead the American Student Dental Association forward. This is an experience I guarantee you I will never forget. I am going to miss the countless emails, travel and conference calls, but it is nice to be able to focus back on school and make sure I actually graduate on time.

Private practice is closer than you think

Finally, after years of hard work, good grades and months of submitting applications, you’ve been accepted into dental school. The pressure is off.

At that point in your life, if you were to have closed your eyes and gazed into your future what would you have seen?  What was your vision?  Did you see yourself in a traditional private practice where you were an extension of your patient family?  A situation similar your family dentist or mentor?  Did you envision the newest hi-tech gadgets in a stylish office in a medical/dental complex?

Anesthesia guidelines change with ADA Resolution 37

The question of anesthesia always comes up when discussing the removal of wisdom teeth. Mine were extracted with the use of local anesthesia and nitrous oxide. Many patients select intravenous sedation or general anesthesia, despite the increased cost and risk. The power to remove pain is one of the greatest tools and practice builders offered to oral professionals. Altering consciousness has been an effective way to reduce patient discomfort since the 19th century. William Morton, an American dentist, used diethyl ether to successfully perform an extraction without pain. Advances in sedation and anesthesia have led to a standardized protocol for painless surgery. However, sedation utilized without proper medical history review and training can lead to tragic consequences. In October 2016, at the American Dental Association (ADA) annual meeting, Resolution 37 was passed. The resolution called for revisions to the safety regulations for providing anesthesia and sedation. The full resolution can be found in Appendix 1 of the Report of Reference Committee C: Dental Education, Science, and Related Matters.

Applying to dental school as an international dentist

I wanted to improve my skills after graduation in 2011. I had received my Bachelor of Dental Surgery in India and desired advanced training. I decided to apply to an accredited U.S. dental school.

The decision seemed simple, but I soon realized the amount of materials required for the application.