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It’s your license at risk, not theirs

Large dental groups can sometimes impose quotas on dentists who work there. Sometimes those quotas include procedures that may be beyond the training and experience of the dentist. In one particular claim, a patient was scheduled for one surface composite restoration. The treatment plan included the extraction of #17, but the patient was supposed to be referred to an OMS for that extraction. The dentist was “pressured” by the employer to extract tooth #17 on the day the patient presented for the surface composite restoration. Concerned that refusing to perform the extraction might have led to consequences in the practice, the dentist extracted the tooth. It was a difficult procedure, and a paresthesia resulted. The dentist was sued, and the lawsuit alleged the dentist performed a procedure beyond his training as well as a lack of communication – the patient thought she was only going to have a restoration.

My experience with refugees

April 7, 1994 was a normal Thursday for most people. But in Eastern Africa, this date marked the start of the Rwandan genocide. An estimated 800,000 lives were lost during the subsequent 100 days. As the genocide transitioned to the Congo, 500,000 Congolese citizens sought refuge throughout central Africa. The United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) estimates there are more than 18 million refugees in sub-Saharan Africa. More than 3 million refugees have settled in the U.S. since 1980, and many are unable to access health care.

Sports dentistry: From final impressions to the NBA Finals

Imagine yourself 10 years from now, running a successful dental practice in your hometown. After a long day of seeing patients, you run through a mental checklist of everything that needs to be done. Did all the lab work get sent out? Are charts up to date? Did the front desk call patients to remind them of their appointments?

What if you also had to figure out what time Kobe Bryant’s helicopter would land outside your office? Or navigate through 20 miles of infamous Southern California rush hour traffic to make it just in time for tipoff ? This is the world of Dr. Jeffrey Hoy, the team dentist for the NBA’s Los Angeles Lakers and NHL’s Los Angeles Kings.

Why I quit med school for dentistry

Changing career paths from medicine to dentistry was the hardest decision of my life. Cultural and familial expectations made me pursue medicine. After some personal reflection, though, I realized that my heart, my convictions and my talents belong in a dental career.

Growing up, my family and culture stressed certain educational paths. My role models were the physicians in our family who encouraged me to follow in their footsteps. Our close bond and passion for the biological sciences pushed me, my twin brother and my cousin all toward medicine. All roads seemed implicitly to point to the medical field.

Train for the DAT like a marathoner

Preparing for the DAT can be one of the most exciting, yet challenging times during a predental’s journey to dental school. You may become overwhelmed trying to find the best study materials or choosing a DAT preparation course. What most students do not realize is that success comes from not only how you utilize materials, but your time as well. One effective strategy is to adopt the mindset of an athlete training for a major event, such as a marathon.