Latest Posts

Four benefits of being bilingual

As part of such a diverse class of dental students, I find myself in awe of how many different languages we can collectively speak. The diversity in my class alone is reflective of the diversity that we have in the U.S. According to the US Census Bureau, about a quarter of Americans speak a language other than English at home. In 2010, Spanish was the widest-spoken language other than English. Other common languages include French, Chinese, Tagalog, Vietnamese, Korean and German. Clearly, in today’s globalized world, multilingualism is increasingly important. Here are some reasons speaking another language can benefit both you and the people around you…

Made for millennials

As the population changes, businesses respond to the needs of their various markets. The insurance industry is no different. At Treloar & Heisel, we work with many large national companies that offer insurance products. Our job is to keep a pulse on the market, assess what’s available and evaluate best fit for our clients on a case-by-case basis. One of the companies that has recently made changes to its disability income product is MassMutual. What’s changed, and why should you care? Read on!

How to get your patients to just say “yes”

Your job during the course of your dental education is to learn what you need to become an excellent practitioner. Much of that knowledge needs to be applied in order for you to learn effectively. Although your school provides you with patients, some of them seem to slip through your hands (metaphorically speaking, of course). Patients are here one day, but gone the next. Some leave because they’re frightened. Some leave because they can’t afford the treatment. But some leave because they don’t want to do what you’re suggesting needs to be done. Since your success in dental school depends on your ability to get your patients to agree to the treatment you recommend, it’s important to understand how to achieve a higher rate of case acceptance.

How to balance dental school and a family

I created this video with the intent to encourage other dental students with families that it is possible to balance school life with family life. It can be overwhelming juggling diapers with crown preps. I do not have it all figured out, but if there is any wisdom to be learned from my mistakes, I hope to pass that on to others like me!

ASDA + Memorang DAT study material giveaway

Before he became Dr. Cohen, Yermie went from MIT where exams were open-book, to medical school at UCLA, where the number of scientific terms to learn was like a daily avalanche. Existing study aids were either outrageously expensive, or too simplistic for higher education. Instead of spending an arm and a leg on test prep, Yermie called upon his MIT network to build a tool that made memorizing easy. A year later, and a third of all medical students in the U.S. were using Memorang to conquer their exams.

Evidence-based dentistry: what you need to know

As a health sciences major, I enrolled in a course called Evidence-Based Practice. Every week, we would learn new skills to apply to the ultimate objective: choose a clinical topic in our field and evaluate the literature to make a (hypothetical) treatment decision. As an undergraduate student with little exposure to clinical research papers, the assigned task seemed overwhelming. The truth is, learning how to evaluate literature is a skill that takes effort and time to develop, but doing so is critical. Evidence-based dentistry is so important, in fact, that it is listed as one of ADEA’s entry-level competencies for graduates entering into practice. Despite this, new dentists struggle to implement it into their practices. The two most frequently cited obstacles are lack of time and insufficient background knowledge to evaluate research critically. If you are unfamiliar with evidence-based dentistry, here are some things to help get you acquainted.