Latest Posts

How synesthesia helps me see the world differently

screen-shot-2016-09-20-at-4-44-53-pmOn my first day of Organic Chemistry, our professor handed each of us a packet containing the major functional groups and their corresponding pKa values. We were told to memorize them. Many students frantically made flashcards, and quizzed each other out loud. Meanwhile, I studied by watching football.

When I looked at the functional groups, I not only saw ketones, esters and carboxylic acids, but to me, each structure resembled an NFL team and my favorite fantasy football players. I make these associations subconsciously. It’s been second nature to me my entire life.

8 tips on surviving your first year of dental school

studying with devicesCongratulations to all the first-year dental students all over the United States. You have all worked very hard to get to this point and must continue to do so to to earn your degree. Starting dental school marks not only the start of an important chapter in your professional career, but also the beginning of many new lifestyle choices. In this transitional, yet critical, point in your dental education, I’d like share some tips to help you survive your first year…

How nature can reboot your mood

natureFor me, the start of third year was the most exciting part of dental school thus far. Finally being in clinic full-time was the light at the end of a two-year tunnel of intense didactic coursework and preclinical projects. Seeing patients of my own also helped me feel like an actual dentist and at my school, we are lucky to each have our own operatory.

I remember the very first day I excitedly walked into my little office–with my own chair, desk, computer and three windowless walls. But, after a month of sitting in the same small room, day after day, I could feel those three walls closing in on me.

Snoring or interrupted sleep may signal a serious condition

osa-mouthingoff-imagecropForty percent of adults over 40 snore – half of them every night; and while for most of these individuals snoring may be nothing more than a social inconvenience, for more than 18 million Americans it may be a symptom of Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA), a potentially life-threatening condition.

How to communicate with your patient: part III (video series)

patient communication part IIIAs dental students, our experiences involving patient communication are rather limited. While we have the ability to practice our craft on a manikin, we can never fully prepare ourselves for the different scenarios where we may need to manage a patient in order to provide quality care. This three-part video series focuses on how to navigate difficult communication situations, so that hopefully you would be prepared when faced with a similar situation!

Now that you’ve learned how to manage an emotionally charged patient (see part I) and how to deal with time delays (see part II), it’s time to learn ways to manage patient expectations.

Thinking about taking a gap year? Consider these 6 things

gap-yearYou’re running a 5K and you’re a quarter away from the finish line. You’re out of breath, you’re exhausted and you’re in desperate need to refuel. You veer off to the side of the path to catch your breath. This is the same scenario you face with taking a gap year. Is it right for you?

When I was faced with the idea of taking a gap year, I was reluctant and unwilling. For me, getting into dental school was the finish line and it seemed so close.

Read on to find out what changed Priscilla’s mind about a gap year!