Is a residency program right for me?

At this time of year, we have become accustomed to answering two questions asked by third year dental students. The first is: “Should I apply to residency programs?” The second is: “How do I know which residency program is right for me?”

Regardless of which school you’re attending, what grade point average you’ve maintained or how many scalings and root planings you’ve completed, we instantly and unequivocally answer “YES!!!” to the first question.

How to build a long-lasting relationship with faculty members

Idea and teamwork concept You know how every chef movie has an aspiring sous chef who admires the head chef, but the head chef either doesn’t have the desire or can’t seem to find time to mentor the sous chef? In this regard, the dental profession is no different from the food preparation profession.

Everyone talks about mentor relationships. Some people have them, but would like more. Some people would like to find just one. No matter how you slice it, if you’d like a mentor, you will probably have to do something to initiate the relationship. So how do you go about creating a mentor relationship with a faculty or senior colleague?

Managing work-life balance

One of the reasons that many of you have chosen dentistry as a profession is to establish autonomy. You’d like to set your own schedule, take vacations when you please and not answer to a boss. However, patients want to be seen early in the morning and late at night, so your workdays will be long. Patients want to be seen during the weekend, so your weekends will be short. While it’s tempting to believe that you will be able to schedule your patients to meet your needs, you may not be able to meet your financial obligations if you do. If you learn to balance your work and your life while you are in dental school, it may be easier for you to continue to do so once you enter the profession. We have some simple suggestions that might help.

Personal accounts on why you need insurance

insuranceAs dentists, we’re in the business of prevention. But what happens when in spite of our preventive efforts, our patients develop a problem? We quickly move into damage control mode to protect our patients’ interests.  Shouldn’t we do the same for ourselves?

That’s why we need insurance.  When something happens, we want to control the damage and protect our interests.  Would you ever consider leaving an auto dealer with your new car and no auto insurance?  You have so much invested in your decision to become a dentist, and as a result of this investment, you have tremendous earning potential.  Yet although you’d insure your car without hesitation, you still haven’t insured yourself.

Maybe you just don’t know what you need.  Unfortunately, both of us got a quick education when we had to use our insurance plans early in our careers.  We are hoping that our stories will help to illustrate which insurance coverage you need as soon as you get your license, and why.