Managing that mid-day slump

We’ve all been there — that moment when our eyes droop during lecture, or we go for our third cup of coffee to make it through afternoon clinic. Through dental school, I’ve gone through various phases of trying to stay awake, but at the start of my fourth year, ahead of NBDE Part 2 and ADEX, I needed to refresh my tactics. I polled my friends on how they coped with exhaustion and found two decidedly different camps: one entirely dependent on caffeine and the other who swear by the power of naps. I decided to investigate both in hopes of nailing down the perfect routine. 

Develop a healthy relationship with competition

Early on, we learned that winning a game of Go Fish or Hide-and-Seek was positive. It gave us a reason to celebrate or be celebrated. Without some competitive spirit, few of us would be here. You’ve probably been first (or close to it) a lot. You’ve compiled a list of “wins” neatly into a CV and presented it proudly. It’s part of who you are and why you’re in dental school. But here, all of your peers have similar résumés. Some may be more impressive than yours. An unfamiliar territory for most, this comparison becomes a source of negativity for many.

Mind full or mindful?

How is your body positioned at this moment? How are your arms and legs situated? Are your shoulders slouched? Is your head bent over? Regardless of the answers, you just practiced mindfulness simply by becoming aware of the present moment. We often go through a whole day without checking in with our bodies. Our minds are constantly jumping from one thought to the next without a break. We rarely allow our minds to rest for even a few minutes in a day.

How exercise can help prevent musculoskeletal disorders

It’s well-known that work-related musculoskeletal disorders are highly prevalent among dentists. A 2009 study by Hayes in the International Journal of Dental Hygiene stated that between 64 and 93 percent of dental professionals experience musculoskeletal pain. In 2016, Leggat published an article in the international journal, Healthcare, claiming the prevalence is 85 percent among dental students.

A review of guided meditation apps

If you keep up with Mouthing Off, then you’ve read several posts about stress relief and mental health. And if you are like me, you read them, but you don’t change any habits because of the notion that “there’s not enough time” to do so. Despite their stress-relieving benefits, I was continually telling myself that I didn’t have the time to do yoga or meditate. Over the past couple months, though, I noticed that with graduation looming, I was not sleeping well. I believed my lack of sleep was due to increased stress, so, while awake in the middle of the night, I searched for ways to relieve stress.