Changing the perception of dentistry: Q&A with ‘Queer Eye’ dentist

This past March, the hit makeover show “Queer Eye” returned to Netflix for a third season, tugging at viewers’ heartstrings as the show’s Fab Five makeover team completely changed the lives of eight deserving “heroes.” This season, the Fab Five went beyond providing a new wardrobe and haircut — they treated one woman, Mary “Shorty” Jones, to a new smile.

Use your smartphone for a smart financial start

Most dental students know what it’s like to live on a budget. After graduation, money will stay tight when student loans come due. Before long, a new dentist will want to buy a practice, buy a house or start a family. As your dental career begins, your financial planning skills will be just as critical as your treatment planning skills.

My path to private practice after serving in the Army

Summer 2016 was a turning point in my dental career. I finished my fifth year in the Army and had one more year to serve on active duty to fulfill my commitment for dental school and my residency program. During dental school, I thought it would be simple to serve my time and leave the military, but as the day of decision approached, it was far from easy.

Motivational interviewing to improve patient outcomes

An article from the Journal of Dental Education defines motivational interviewing (MI) as a “person-centered, goal-directed method of communication for eliciting and strengthening intrinsic motivation for behavior change.” In dentistry, MI is a strategy that can be used to improve patient outcomes and acceptance of treatment plan and suggestions for oral health care by increasing a patient’s motivation for behavior change.

From private practice to dental school

After over a decade of working as a general dentist in England, my wife and I decided to move to her hometown, Los Angeles. This decision brought one huge implication: My dental degree and license were not accepted by the state of California. So I set out to enter a program for international dentists, which meant spending at least two years in dental school again.