First comes love, then comes dental school: Planning a wedding on busy schedule

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After my fiancé got down on one knee and placed the ring on my finger, there was about a 24 hour time lapse before I felt the world closing in on me. I had already over-committed to extracurricular activities and I had both my NBDE and clinical entrance exams to prepare for this year. How was I going to manage planning my dream wedding on top of that?

Dental gifts that are better late than never

holiday giftsMerry Christmas! If you have a post-holiday gift exchange scheduled, it’s not too late to buy something for your friends in the dental field. Dental presents, like all good presents, come in a wide variety. Some presents make us think, some make us laugh and some make us cry tears of joy. We will keep this in mind as we search for the best, funniest and most interesting presents for our favorite dental students and dentists.

We must take into consideration many things when searching for the perfect present, be it a large box with a bow under the tree or a small stocking stuffer. Who are we buying this present for? Is it something they will use or is it something to make them laugh? What is our budget? The most important part of any good present is the thought behind it. The only criterion in our search for the perfect present is that it brings joy to a fellow dentistry enthusiast.

Here are some fun ideas for your very own gifts:

Fantasy football as a dental-school outlet

footballThe life of a dental student is definitely a challenging one to say the least. It is a juggling act that you perfect year-to-year as you encounter new challenges along the way. As a first year dental student, you are in a state of shock as you try to keep up with a new and demanding routine. As a second year dental student, you have new challenges as preclinical work gets heavier, you begin treating patients, and you prepare for part I of the National Board Exam. As a third year dental student, you still have difficulty but a completely new set of challenges as patient care becomes your primary focus. Then finally, as a fourth year dental student, it all comes to a close. You hope you have enough requirements to graduate on time and prepare to complete your final Board and licensing exams. Interestingly enough, I have learned that there is one thing that brings many dental students together regardless of year classification and that, of all things, is fantasy football.

An artistic use for toothbrushes

MarFor me and many of my classmates, it was our initial interest in the arts led us to eventually pursue dentistry. Whether it was handwritten calligraphy, playing musical instruments, photography, or even graphic design, being able to use our creative processes to better serve the oral health needs of our communities was a perfect match. Although our focus has shifted from the aesthetic to the esthetic, we are still able to build and create things for others using our hands. Art led us to dentistry, but sometimes we see the reverse – when science and dentistry become a source inspiration for artists. My curiosity one day led me to a Google search for “dentistry in art,” which yielded several rather interesting results: 17th and 18th century paintings of men surrounding a grimacing patient being treated, carvings of demons and spirits in teeth, and even pairs of shoes lined by human teeth. Yikes.

Know your wine for better networking

Wine infographic“Let’s settle it over a round” …of golf, that is. Golfing has long been seen as an escape, as well as work desk outside of the office. Countless deals and partnerships have been formed in the informal, enjoyable setting of a golf course. Similar networking can take place in other leisurely situations. Enjoying a glass of wine with a colleague is much easier and less time consuming than golf. Check out this infographic to up your wine game…

6 tips to care for your pup’s smile

Screen Shot 2015-04-29 at 9.10.53 PMHas anyone ever told you that a dog’s mouth is cleaner than a human’s? Unfortunately there is no real way to compare the two; it’s much like comparing apples to oranges. Dogs and humans have species-specific bacteria in their mouths. For example, caries disease caused by S. mutans, prevalent in almost 90% of school children, only plagues 5% of our canine companions. S. mutans, which feed on sugar, are much more likely to reside in our mouths than a dog’s due to our high sugar diet and acidic oral environment. On the other hand, P. gingivalis, the culprit to human periodontal disease, has a sibling strain found in dogs called P. gulae. Periodontal disease can be found in more than 60% of domesticated dogs, and that percentage can be as high as 90% in senior small breeds. Dental abscesses and periodontal disease can be life threatening to dogs. It is important that we take care of their oral health starting at a young age! Here are some tips to get started.