How will the Trump administration address oral health care?

On January 20, 2017, President Donald Trump was inaugurated as the 45th president of the United States. Just a week before the inauguration, both the U.S. House of Representatives and U.S. Senate passed budget resolutions that serve as initial steps in repealing the Affordable Care Act (ACA). President Trump’s health care reform plan strongly supports the repeal of the ACA, and make no mention of dentistry or oral health, perpetuating the status quo of oral health being left out of general health. As the country faces a major potential shift in health policy, it’s important that we consider how this may affect our profession.

Know the drill on health insurance marketplaces

142030139For the first 21 years of my life, I did not have dental insurance. I just paid out-of-pocket costs whenever I needed care. For me, this wasn’t an issue because I took care of my teeth and, thankfully, didn’t have many problems. I always assumed, however, that if a problem ever did arise, getting the information on attaining dental insurance would be as simple as asking my dentist.

4 ways the ACA will (and will not) impact dentistry

ACAIt is 2014 and the inaugural year of the Affordable Care Act implementation. Curious if dentistry has etched (primed and bonded) its way into ACA? I can tell you, it has. The watchword in regards to our field is “prevention”—detailed in the 21 oral health provisions of ACA. If you’ve avoided the daunting task of reading the ACA, you may have a few questions. Let me decode those for you here…