Motivational interviewing to improve patient outcomes

An article from the Journal of Dental Education defines motivational interviewing (MI) as a “person-centered, goal-directed method of communication for eliciting and strengthening intrinsic motivation for behavior change.” In dentistry, MI is a strategy that can be used to improve patient outcomes and acceptance of treatment plan and suggestions for oral health care by increasing a patient’s motivation for behavior change.

How to be a good leader

Whether in school or after in a practice setting, achieving your goals will usually come down to one thing: being a good leader. Leaders in a dental practice are the backbone of an operation; a good leader can inspire an inexperienced team to do things that a team that has been together for 10+ years but with no leadership cannot. Because a successful leader is invaluable to any team, at Heartland Dental, we invest in leadership development for supported doctors. While a leader needs to be many things to be successful, here are just a few of the most important traits to have.

The ABCs to my life

Decisions shape the course of our lives like a hot PKT on wax. Many times people find decision-making stressful and burdensome. I am no different, however I always turn to my ABC’s to help simplify the situation. The ABC’s to my life are something I invented in college. Although I obtained a chemistry degree, one of the most valuable takeaways was self-discovery. The ABC’s I developed can be used to handle any situation.

How to communicate with your patient: part II (video series)

Patient communication part IIAs dental students, our experiences involving patient communication are rather limited. While we have the ability to practice our craft on a manikin, we can never fully prepare ourselves for the different scenarios where we may need to manage a patient in order to provide quality care. This three-part video series focuses on how to navigate difficult communication situations, so that hopefully you would be prepared when faced with a similar situation!

Now that you’ve learned how to manage an emotionally charged patient (see part I), it’s time to learn ways to communicate when a procedure might take longer than planned.