Women strive for equality in advanced degree programs

Although the number of women in higher education is growing, they have yet to achieve equity. This gap is prominent in dentistry, where men outnumber women in school and in practice. In the 1960s, 10 percent of students in medical, law and MBA programs were women. In the 1990s, the number of graduate student women began to outnumber men.

A student’s take on the New Dentist Committee

I am at the start of my third year, wondering how I am going to survive through all the clinical requirements, when I am asked to be a student representative for the New Dentist Committee of the Southern Nevada Dental Society. I hesitated at first, having so much on my plate already. In the end I decided it would be a very good opportunity to get involved in a different aspect of dentistry. A year later, I can officially say I am glad to be a part of this group.

New screening for oral cancer could make for quicker detection

Oral cancer kills 40 percent of those diagnosed within five years. If caught early, the survival rate is as high as 90 percent. Scarier still, more than 1 percent of U.S. adults will develop oral cancer at some point in their lives. Despite these sobering statistics, many patients aren’t screened regularly for the appearance of oral and pharyngeal cancers. According to Matthew Kim – chairman, founder and CEO of Vigilant Biosciences – only 29 percent of U.S. adults are screened by their dentist. Part of the oversight, he explains, is a widespread lack of awareness and understanding of the danger of oral cancer. His plan, in addition to increasing awareness for the general public, involves a novel diagnostic test that identifies patients as high risk of developing certain types of oral cancer.