Factors to consider when purchasing dental loupes

“What magnification did you order?” This is the first question I asked my colleagues when the Loupes Fair came to LECOM School of Dental Medicine. Dental loupes became an obsession for me and my research partner, Melissa Matick, in January. The buzz within the first-year class was about which brand was best and which magnification each student had chosen. Melissa and I did want to know these answers, but we also wanted to dig deeper.

Is the media making dentists look bad?

newspapers-tabletThis article originally appeared in the Fall 2014 issue of Mouth. At the time, Stephanie Mazariegos, LECOM ’15, was the trustee from District 5. To read more from Mouth, click here.

For every headline that indicates dentists rank high among “most trusted professions,” there’s another condemning a dentist for fraud or patient mistreatment. As you enter a profession that relies on public trust, consider that the actions you take are a reflection on both you and the profession itself.

Is the media making dentists look bad?

Ethical terms such as nonmaleficence, autonomy and beneficence stand at the forefront of quality patient care…

How nature can reboot your mood

natureFor me, the start of third year was the most exciting part of dental school thus far. Finally being in clinic full-time was the light at the end of a two-year tunnel of intense didactic coursework and preclinical projects. Seeing patients of my own also helped me feel like an actual dentist and at my school, we are lucky to each have our own operatory.

I remember the very first day I excitedly walked into my little office–with my own chair, desk, computer and three windowless walls. But, after a month of sitting in the same small room, day after day, I could feel those three walls closing in on me.

3 products that make video conferencing easy

Business meeting in office, chatting on video conferenceThe time we spend in dental school is filled with countless hours studying for exams, never-ending practice in the simulation clinic and preparing for procedures once we enter patient clinics. A dental student’s world is already packed full of academic responsibilities, so fitting in meetings that are accommodating to everyone’s schedule is an arduous task for any leader. Luckily, in a society where working from home is becoming common practice, virtual communication can bring together leaders in a manner that’s both convenient academically as well as relaxing for greater productivity.

Instagram: Connecting dentists worldwide

UCLA Ideal ASDAMost of you reading this blog know the impact that social media has on our lives. Facebook, Twitter and Instagram (in particular) have changed the way people are able to see the world. It has become a platform to expose ideas, promote businesses and give us a glimpse into people’s lives. It has even connected our dental student cultures, changing the way we view other schools and altered the way we communicate from hundreds of miles away.

The spread of dental knowledge and ideas is now unstoppable thanks to the Internet. Dentists and dental students alike can easily share tips, techniques, events and ideas. Having trouble getting the perfect contact on your class II composite? Need inspiration for a good theme for the upcoming ASDA social? Turning to Instagram is now a fun and unique option for answers.

P’s get degrees: Pass/fail grading in dental school

pass/failUp until dental school, most of us took every exam looking for that desired “A” to stay academically competitive and turn our dental dreams into reality. Currently there are a number of dental schools breaking that mold and implementing a pass-fail grading system. Anything above a set point determined by the school or professor is simply considered passing or a “P” grade. While some people question the GPA-lacking method, in 2012 the Joint Commission on National Dental Examinations (JCNDE) announced the switch to pass-fail was being adopted by the NBDE. The JCNDE’s reason for the change was that numerical grades are not always reflective of the competencies needed to be a successful professional or resident…

The nail-biting truth of onychophagists

biting-nailsDo you bite your nails? If so, you may think you’re doing yourself a favor by efficiently engaging in normal grooming activities. But using your teeth instead of fingernail clippers or nail files typically means that you’re suffering from a pathologic grooming condition known as onychophagia and are doing more harm than good. An onychophagist, or more commonly a ‘nail biter,’ is a person who habitually bites his or her fingernails. Nail biting is a common oral habit among children and young adults, and is the most common of the typical ‘nervous habits’ such as nose picking, hair pulling, tooth grinding or skin picking (Sachan). According to the DSM-5, nail biting is an impulse control disorder and is classified under obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and related disorders (APA)…