Dentistry in the Community Grant recipients share outreach successes

To kick off ASDA’s Week of Service, we are highlighting the achievements of the 2017 Dentistry in the Community grant recipients. In February 2017, five chapters were awarded $500 each to develop and implement a program or event that focuses on the prevention of dental disease and/or the promotion of oral health for any underserved population within their community. Here, we’re highlighting each of those events.

How it’s made: CAD/CAM dentistry

With more and more industries moving away from physical information, many are looking at technology as a more efficient means of capturing, translating and delivering that information. While CAD/CAM (Computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing) dentistry has been around for a few decades, the technology itself has matured to the point where it is more accessible in terms of cost and usability. Whether it’s used to digitally send an impression to a lab or to provide a patient with a same-day crown, CAD/CAM technology is quickly being integrated into the field of dentistry.

With that being said, this video is a very basic introduction to the general workflow for a CAD/CAM crown. While this video uses a specific system, the concepts discussed are general and relevant to most systems.

Should I specialize? Assess your value system

Depending on who you talk to, choosing to specialize could be either a premature decision where you miss out on the satisfaction of practicing a broad spectrum of dental procedures, or a great decision that will enable you to refine a highly-honed skillset simply by investing in a few additional years of schooling. This often means spending some time sorting through advice and anecdotes from friends, family and mentors in order to form your own decision on the matter. However, I believe that the best way to make an informed decision about specializing is to honestly assess yourself.

Making the most of my summer as an ADPAC extern

ADPAC externs Elieza Tang, Midwestern-Arizona '19, and Nancy Mo, Columbia ‘19After completing my first year of dental school at Midwestern, I was thrilled that we were given a long summer break. I knew that this would be my last “true” summer vacation, so I wanted to make the most of it. I could not think of a better way to spend my summer than serving as one of two Washington D.C. ADPAC externs along with Nancy Mo (Columbia ‘19). It was an unforgettable experience. In just four short weeks, I learned more than I ever expected.

ADPAC, or the American Dental Political Action Committee, is a bipartisan organization dedicated to educating dentists on legislative issues and supporting political candidates who support issues related to dentistry. ADPAC is one of the nation’s largest medical PACs and it represents the voice of over 150,000 dentists. The main goal of ADPAC is to advance the dental profession and voice our collective concerns regarding the issues that impact our profession.

How to communicate with your patient: part III (video series)

patient communication part IIIAs dental students, our experiences involving patient communication are rather limited. While we have the ability to practice our craft on a manikin, we can never fully prepare ourselves for the different scenarios where we may need to manage a patient in order to provide quality care. This three-part video series focuses on how to navigate difficult communication situations, so that hopefully you would be prepared when faced with a similar situation!

Now that you’ve learned how to manage an emotionally charged patient (see part I) and how to deal with time delays (see part II), it’s time to learn ways to manage patient expectations.

How to communicate with your patient: part II (video series)

Patient communication part IIAs dental students, our experiences involving patient communication are rather limited. While we have the ability to practice our craft on a manikin, we can never fully prepare ourselves for the different scenarios where we may need to manage a patient in order to provide quality care. This three-part video series focuses on how to navigate difficult communication situations, so that hopefully you would be prepared when faced with a similar situation!

Now that you’ve learned how to manage an emotionally charged patient (see part I), it’s time to learn ways to communicate when a procedure might take longer than planned.