Don’t overdo it

In high school, I started going to the gym every day and avoiding junk food because I wanted to be healthier. I couldn’t run 400 meters without getting winded. I spent hours in front of my computer. My favorite Saturday lunchtime tradition was getting a pizza from Pizza Hut and eating it all myself. At first, exercising more and eating less junk food did make me feel healthier. I felt more alert. I could finally run a mile without stopping. I became more confident in myself and less clumsy when I walked.

But with my aspiring-dentist Type-A personality, exercise and eating became parts of my life that I liked to work on obsessively. When I moved away to college in Boston, hundreds of miles away from home, I was excited to make my own decisions.

How will the Trump administration address oral health care?

On January 20, 2017, President Donald Trump was inaugurated as the 45th president of the United States. Just a week before the inauguration, both the U.S. House of Representatives and U.S. Senate passed budget resolutions that serve as initial steps in repealing the Affordable Care Act (ACA). President Trump’s health care reform plan strongly supports the repeal of the ACA, and make no mention of dentistry or oral health, perpetuating the status quo of oral health being left out of general health. As the country faces a major potential shift in health policy, it’s important that we consider how this may affect our profession.

Sugar taxes sweep the ballot

hand holding soda can pouring out sugar content Election season is always an exciting time in the United States. On November 8, 2016, Americans took to the polls to not only vote for elected officials, but to also weigh in on state, local and federal measures. This year, residents of three California cities – Albany, Oakland and San Francisco – and Boulder, Colorado, had the opportunity to voice their opinions on ballot measures to implement taxes on sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs). Additionally, the Cook County Board of Commissioners voted on implementing a sugar tax in Cook County, Illinois on November 10, 2016.

Graduation: Looking back on lessons learned

Graduation Caps Thrown in the AirGraduation is here, and you can almost see the finish line. After D4 requirements, NBDE Part II, residency applications and licensure clinical exams: poof, you’ll be a dentist! The blood, sweat and tears that you put in over the last four years are finally going to pay off. When thinking about the last few years, I began to wonder: Am I better off today than I was four years ago?

How to find the right fitness class for you

fitness classWhen I initially started taking fitness classes, I was intimidated by the sheer volume of classes offered by my local gym. I wished that there was a comprehensive beginner’s guide to help me choose a class that aligned with my fitness level and goals. If you are looking for a fun and easy way to stay physically active, read on to find out which of my top three favorite fitness classes is right for you.

Win a copy of The ADA Practical Guide to Internet Marketing

J061_InternetMarketing_Web_ReadyPractice management and marketing is an area that we learn little about in dental school. When asking students from various schools, it seems that in general, many schools lack a curriculum that includes instruction in company/practice management, marketing, branding and financial management. Through my involvement in ASDA, I have learned the majority of what I know regarding management and marketing at ASDA conferences and workshops. The ADA Guide to Internet Marketing did a fantastic job at filling the gap and opening up the complex world of how the Internet can play into your management.

Racial violence is a public health crisis #WhiteCoats4Blacklives

10432465_10152462170235588_3041522259078267570_nIn the wake of the recent high profile police brutality cases, protests have erupted all around the country. Many of the protests have been highly visible, like the Millions March in Washington DC or NBA players showing support with “I can’t breathe” shirts.

A unique movement, “White coats for Black lives”, staged “die-ins” at over 70 universities in the effort to draw a parallel to the racial bias in police to the iniquities in the health of people of color. Physicians for a National Health Program organized the movement using social media and the hashtag #Whitecoats4Blacklives. Most protests were conducted with the full support or administrators and school deans. The events involved medical students laying en masse on the floor of campus grounds, libraries, and public spaces. Some protestors carried signs saying, “#publichealthcrisis” and “End Police Brutality.” The initiative hopes to open a dialogue and draw attention to poor health outcomes for minorities in the United States and systematic racism in health care education, administration, and delivery.