Treating your first patient

Your first experience interacting with a patient face-to-face can be a little intimidating. It may be the first time you feel like a real dentist, even though you’re still in the middle of your studies. You’ll always remember that first patient. As your clinical knowledge grows, you may even think back to how that first visit could have gone smoother. Despite all the pre-clinical training we receive, interacting with real patients is different than sitting in a lecture with other students. Here are five tips to make the first experience a positive one.

Keeping the patient’s best interest in mind

Patient in chairWith so many factors that go into treatment planning (cost, insurance coverage, time requirements, length of procedures, knowledge of the treatment, fear), sometimes we may lose sight of what is best for the patient. Never make assumptions. Get to know your patients. Make sure that he or she understands what the procedure entails and is clear on the pros and cons of every treatment option. Taking the time to listen to the patient and explain all possible treatment options and ways for future prevention is paramount to treating each person in the best way possible.

Eight steps you can take to treat children with autism

boy with autismOne out of sixty-eight children are diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). As such, many of your future patients will fall somewhere on this spectrum. Autism encompasses a wide range of neurodevelopmental disorders characterized by social impairment, communication difficulty and restrictive, repetitive stereotyped behavior. Here are 7 steps you can take to treat patients with autism…