What to expect while expecting in dental school

May 14, 2016 is a day that I will never forget. My first year of dental school was behind me, and I was standing at the altar marrying my best friend. Since then, life has exceeded my expectations and filled me with wonderful memories. On September 25, 2016, my wife approached me with a worrisome look. I had seen her worried before, but this was different. I listened as she said three words that changed my life forever: “I am pregnant.”

As an expecting father and dental student, balancing life and school can be difficult. Although it is not as difficult as it would be if I were the one who’s pregnant. The hardest part for me is missing some of my wife’s appointments. While it is frustrating, it does not compare to the obstacles faced by pregnant students. To better understand the challenges of being pregnant, I interviewed two expecting student mothers from my dental school. Justina Boles (D1) is expecting her second child in September and Leigh Lloyd (D4) is expecting her first child in June.

Contour Extended: Hidden Figures in dentistry

Dear Hidden Figures,

Perhaps you have seen the new motion picture that describes the life of Katherine Johnson, an African-American math prodigy who grew up in White Sulfur Springs, West Virginia. She grew up counting numbers and manually computing equations. In 1953 she began working for the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA), later known at NASA. She joined hundreds of other women as a human computer. Pre-dating Apple or Microsoft, these women helped to win the race to space. As a math computer, she completed calculations for Alan Shepard, John Glenn, the Apollo moon landing mission, and the start of the space shuttle program.

Dr. Lucy Hobbs Taylor paves way for women as first female dentist

This article originally appeared as a cover story in the March 2015 issue of ASDA News. At the time, Laura Albarracin was her chapter’s legislative liaison. To read more from ASDA’s print publication, Contour, click here.

Before the 1970s, dentistry was a male-dominated profession. Women were not admitted to dental school solely based on gender. However, this did not stop determined people from breaking stereotypes. That decade marked a time when the world was changing. Two catalytic moments were the women’s liberation and civil rights movements of the 1960s and early 1970s. This movement resulted in an increase in federal grants, which led way to an increase of female enrollments in professional health schools. According to an article written by Dr. Lynn D. Carlisle on Spiritofcaring.com, the women of the 1970s used this moment to forever change the landscape of the medical and dental fields.

The growing presence of women in dentistry

female dentistAs a high school senior, I had an opportunity to interview for a collegiate scholarship, during which I discussed my aspirations for a career in dentistry with an all-male panel of judges. I remember being asked, “Why don’t you want to be a dental hygienist or an assistant? Aren’t those the typical roles in dentistry for a female?”

I was taken aback. I was sure that it wasn’t their intention to instill self-doubt in a woman pursuing a career in a male-dominated industry. However, I couldn’t help but feel as if I was being relegated to another career, based strictly on traditional gender roles.

How I balance beauty pageants and dental school

Screen Shot 2014-06-06 at 4.23.41 PMBeauty pageants aren’t my thing, but scholarship pageants are. As a 22 year-old dental student, you might wonder why I would be involved with the Miss America Organization and how I juggle my ASDA commitments and studies. Nine times out of 10, I believe that living in the present and following passions is more valuable than sticking to a rigid schedule. I picked up this mentality from the Miss America Organization.